What you think can alter your health - and even your DNA June 19 2018

They're calling it the next frontier in the field of health: mind-body medicine. We've been on that band wagon for almost two decades!

Many extraordinary, well-researched studies have demonstrated a very direct link between our emotions, beliefs and thoughts, and the health of our physical body - even measurable changes in our genetic code.

 

It's possible to rewrite our body with the way we think.

Of course, a good diet is still important, but  we now know that our health is also dependent on our mental and emotional well-being.

"Researchers at the prestigious Benson-Henry Institute for Mind/Body Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital where 26 adults (without prior experience) were taught a number of clinically-backed relaxation techniques including mindfulness, meditation and mantra (the repetition of sacred Hindu sounds) in order to understand the effects of these mind-focused practices on the body and specifically the test subjects genetic code. The study participants were given comprehensive blood tests immediately preceding and immediately following 20 minutes of self-directed practice of the above techniques. By studying an impressive 22,000 different gene sequences, researchers were able to identify and measure any changes—no matter how small—that occurred in the participants’ DNA during and after the practice of the various meditation, mantra and mindfulness techniques."

 

Surprise!

Every single one of the study participants’ DNA demonstrated significant, measurable changes in the genes that researchers had identified as being responsible for, or related to, metabolism, aging, insulin response and relaxation, among many others.

Read the rest of Carl Stronter's UPLIFT article here.

 

And, our beliefs can shape our waistlines

This article from the New York Times states:

"The secret to a narrower waistline and a longer life span might be found in the corridors of our minds as much as in the cardio rooms of our gyms. A recent epidemiological study suggests that our beliefs about how much we exercise may substantially influence our health and longevity, even if those beliefs are objectively inaccurate — which hints that upending our thinking about exercise might help us whittle away pounds, whether we work out more or not."

 Find out more about how Alia Crum, the head of the Mind & Body Lab at Stanford University and her co-author reached this conclusion in the original NYT article.